Chalka chalka re

The phenomenon of the various regional language film industries feeding material to the Hindi film industry in Bombay, and vice-versa, has been going on for a long time. In a country so diverse in its cultures and languages, it was always been natural to translate what works from one market into another market in the hopes of recapturing its success. In the early 90s, A. R. Rahman‘s music made it to a wider audience through very much this same process, of Tamil films being dubbed for a Hindi audience. By the early 2000s, while A.R. Rahman was still being translated to Hindi on occasion, there was a small surge of remakes instead of the dubs. The Hindi film industry was going through a small resurgence and the larger budgets meant remaking a film with more recognisable cast and in recognisable settings for the Hindi audience was a viable and attractive option. Chalka chalka re from the 2002 film Saathiya was one such song translated into Hind in a remake of a Tamil film (Alaipayuthey).
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Mahi ve, mohabattan sachiyane

There are some films that are a huge deal when they are released, and fade away into obscurity over time. Sometimes it’s because of the marketing machine and sometimes the film is something different enough for people to take notice, but there are always ever shinier trinkets to pay attention to and their time in the limelight passes. The 2002 film Kaante is one such film, whose large star cast and novel execution for the time made it an important milestone. It still is a milestone in some ways, part of which is the piece of the film that most survives in present memory, the song Mahi ve.
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Dil kabootar khana hai

In the early 2000s, there was a rash of films that were either made by film-makers of India origin living in other parts of the world, or by Indian film-makers about the Indian diaspora, and clearly targeted at that audience. Even if they were in Hindi, they were not quite Bollywood films, and in fact they varyingly paid homage to or outright ridiculed popular Hindi cinema tropes within their story. Inevitably, some of them attempted to incorporate the traditional bundle of songs that are part of any Hindi film into the proceedings, in subtle and sometimes less subtle ways. Dil kabootar khana hai, from Deepa Mehta’s 2002 Canadian production Bollywood/Hollywood is one such song that stands out in memory.
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Mujhe mil jo jaye thoda paisa

If the great golden run of Indian pop music peaked during the mid 1990s, by the end of the the century and into the new millennium it was pretty much dead. A few established acts were still releasing the odd song video, but gone were the crazy over-the-top productions and the songs that truly took chances. The promise of satellite television, arguably the instigator of the popularity of pop in the 1990s, had come through in some ways, but not in the explosive creativity department. By this time, Hindi cinema was truly starting to become slick and impressive, not only in the visuals and concept department, but also in the songs they introduced into the entertainment ecosystem. The audiences returned to their comfortable teat of Hindi film music and pop was lost. But there are always a few hold outs, and in 2002, seemingly out of nowhere, came the band Agosh with their song Mujhe mil jo jaye thoda paisa.
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